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Why I hate systemd even though migration was easy


I finally moved my Arch to Systemd because in the last few days I had the feeling that if I won’t do it now I will run into serious trouble.

I have to admit, that I have never been a big fan of the movement to Systemd. Initscripts was simple. It worked well for me and never had complaints about it. So why move to something else? And I had the feeling that Systemd is just the new sow that gets driven through the village (german saying).

Okay, but I don’t make the decisions and there is no opt-out from Systemd. So I sat down last night and went through the three steps of migration as described in the wiki. I rebooted every now and then and made sure that I did not break anything. And today my MacBook Pro is running a initscripts free Arch Linux. The only problem was the pommed daemon, which had no real systemd unit and was relying on Systemd’s initscript compatibility. But I found a light version in the AUR that also had the missing units. Nice. Took only about an hour and I am done.

But today I noticed that pm-suspend triggered by acpid did not work too well anymore. Or better: suspending worked as usual, but then waking up again it seemed that now Systemd’s own powermanagement tools kicked in and send the book back to sleep again. I now had to wake my laptop twice (now more akin to me, but not what I had in mind). I disabled the acpid unit again with no effect, because I missed the acpid.socket, which I never explicitly enabled. Until I noticed this I just removed the lines in the handler.sh file.

And now what? All done? I am afraid not. There probably will turn up other issues I would not have when I would be using initscripts again. And that is what bothers me most. I have to take care of problems I did not get, because I wanted to change my system. I don’t like spending my free time on all that.


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